You Decide History

Pledge Program

Convention Listings

 

Featured Products

Long Range Desert Group (LRDG): is a solitaire game covering small-scale British operations against the Axis forces in North Africa. The player has to carry out one of four missions, or string all four together in a campaign game….

Merrill’s Marauders: is a solitaire game covering missions behind Japanese lines in the Burmese jungle. The player has to carry out one of four missions, or string all four together in a campaign game…

Barbarossa Deluxe: A strategic-level, two-player “mini-monster” of intermediate complexity, designed by Ty Bomba, covering the entire Russo-German War…

American Revolution: This is a ziplock reprint of the original game. It has one map. Includes a 32-page booklet and a PAC…



DGEnewsletter300x200

4 hours ago

Did you know?

The first attempted use of naval airpower for bombardment occurred in 1849. The Austrian navy released 200 bomb-laden hot air balloons from one of its ships, Vulcano, against the rebelling city of Venice, Italy. Plagued with uncooperative winds, only one of the balloons hit the city. In the end, the bomb did not leave any appreciable damage.
... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

Today in Military History
24 May 1941

HMS Hood is sunk by the German battleship Bismarck in the Battle of the Denmark Strait. Sailing west from Norway, Bismarck and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen attempted to break into the North Atlantic to engage Allied merchant ships. They were met by a British fleet, led by the battleship HMS Prince of Wales and the battlecruiser HMS Hood. The engagement began at 5:52 a.m. at a distance of 15 miles. The British struck first, with Prince of Wales hitting Bismarck. The Germans returned fire minutes later, with both warships targeting HMS Hood. As Hood attempted to turn to engage the German warships with its aft main guns, a shell hit her magazine, causing an enormous explosion. Within minutes Hood would sink beneath the waves, taking all but three of her crew down with her.
... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Armed Forces Day
Observing the first Armed Forces Day in Washington D.C. Reviewing the parade are (L-R) Gen. Dwight Eisenhower; Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson and President Truman. Photo taken 20 May 1950.
We are grateful to all that have served.
... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago

Today in Military History
19 May 1655

England invades the Spanish-held island of Jamaica during the Anglo-Spanish War. Following his victory in the First Anglo-Dutch War, Oliver Cromwell turned his attention toward Spain. After failing to capture the Spanish port at Santo Domingo, the English fleet under Adm. William Penn decided to capture Jamaica. Unlike the Santo Domingo, the Spanish defenses in Jamaica were light, with just over 1,500 settlers and soldiers on the island. With 30 ships and 7,000 soldiers, the English were able to overwhelm the Spanish and capture the island. Following the Treaty of Madrid in 1670, the island was ceded to the English, eventually becoming one of the most profitable colonies in British control.
... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago

Today in Military History
17 May 1943

Royal Air Force No. 617 Squadron takes part in Operation Chastise, targeting German dams in the Ruhr Valley. Important to the German war industry, the dams provided hydro-electric power for making steel. The British command calculated repeated air strikes could destroy the dams, but would result in high losses, and accuracy was an issue. The British enlisted the aid of inventor Barnes Wallis, who had previously developed the Grand Slam earthquake bomb. At 22,000 lbs. the Grand Slam was the most powerful non-atomic bomb used during the war. Using the concept of the Grand Slam (a large explosive would be needed to breach the dams), Wallis developed the Vickers Type 464 “Upkeep” bouncing bomb. At nearly 10,000 lbs. the bomb was designed to skip across the water to hit the dam. In the early morning on 17 May, a flight of 19 Lancaster bombers attacked the dams. Two dams were breached, and one was lightly damaged in the attack. The breached dams caused catastrophic flooding in the Ruhr Valley, killing around 1,600 civilians (nearly 1,000 of those were Soviet force-labor prisoners).
... See MoreSee Less

DGSocialStoreTab300x200